Economics Courses

 

ECON101 Principles of Economics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to economic theory in terms of the American economic system including economic growth, national income and its distribution, markets and prices, economic instability, the public sector of the economy, and the relationship with the world economy.

Prerequisite:  MATH100

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON102  Principles of Macroeconomics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the study of the nation's economy as a whole, which looks at the aggregate behavior of consumers, business, and the government.  It focuses on the issues of inflation, unemployment, and economic growth.  The course explores why and how economies grow, economic fluctuations, the banking system, fiscal management, and how macroeconomic policy is implemented under different circumstances.

Prerequisite:  MATH100 or MATH112


 

ECON103  Principles of Microeconomics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An introduction to the organization and operation of a market economy with a focus on how it allocates scarce resources; to the analysis of consumer demand and profit-maximizing behavior of businesses; and of pricing and output decisions under conditions of competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and imperfect competition in a global marketplace.  The course includes an analysis of markets for labor and capital.  Policy issues include price ceilings and floors, and taxes.

Prerequisite:  MATH100


 

ECON301 Economics of the Environment

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An application of economic analysis to problems of the environment, such as air, water, and land pollution; natural resource depletion; and preservation of species and natural areas.  Specific aspects will include externalities, measurement of costs and benefits, alternative abatement strategies, allocation of property rights, and theories of renewable and nonrenewable resources.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 OR ECON103 )

Corequisite:   None


  

ECON310 Intermediate Macroeconomics

An intermediate study of economy in aggregate terms with analysis of national income, production, inflation, and employment.  It also examines different economic models for both the short and long-run, and what these models imply about economic growth, monetary, fiscal and income policies for achieving economic stability.

Prerequisite:  ECON101


 

ECON315 Intermediate Microeconomics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

Provides an in-depth examination of how to model consumption and production decisions, and their interactions in the markets.  Particular forms of market failure are analyzed together with possible government intervention on those markets, as well as the effect of such interventions on the decision of the firm.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 OR ECON103 )

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON328 Social Science Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]
A thematic or topical approach, with emphasis on historical/political/economic analysis. Treatment of historical, contemporary and/or comparative topics (for example, the historical roots and contemporary practice of terrorism and its political and economic impact; the impact of imperialism --political, economic, and historical-- in different global areas; the frontier experience of Russian Siberia and the American West) within a framework provided by the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON330 Economic Development
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
Intermediate utilization of the tools of economic analysis for examining the models of economic growth and development. Theories applied to underdeveloped regions of the earth. Interdisciplinary nature includes study of political, sociological, historical, and technological factors in growth and development.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 )

Corequisite: None


 

 

ECON340 Money & Banking

An examination of the role of money and credit in the U.S. economy. The course gives an overview of financial instruments, markets, and intermediaries along with the evolution and regulation of the financial system. Attention is given to bank lending and the money supply process as controlled by the Federal Reserve System. Formulation of monetary policy is studied as are alternative monetary theories and international aspects of banking and finance.

Prerequisite:  ECON101


 

ECON350 Comparative Economic Systems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

A comparison of the market economy, and the socialist and centrally administered economy.  The content emphasizes the capitalist systems of the world and the economic systems in transition from being centrally planned to market directed.  It also covers the collapse of communism and the emergence of less developed economies.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 OR ECON102 )

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON355 International Trade & Finance

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An examination of international economics, which is concerned with the trade among nations. Topics include, but are not limited to, trade theory, trade restrictions such as tariffs and non-tariff barriers, trade policies of less developed countries, the determination of exchange rates, international monetary problems, international organizations and trade agreements, and issues related to U.S. commercial policies.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 )

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON360 Current Economic Problems

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]

An application of the analytical tools of economics to a variety of contemporary policy issues.  Costs and benefits of social regulation are assessed in connection with such problems as inflation, poverty and income distribution, environmental pollution, economic growth and technological change, and provision of education and medical care.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 ) OR (ECON102)

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON410 Econometrics

[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3sh ]

An introduction to empirical research in economics and the economic techniques used in forecasting.

Prerequisite: ( ECON101 AND ECON310 AND ECON315 AND MATH107 )

Corequisite:   None


 

ECON628 Social Science Seminar
[Minimum Semester Hours: 3 sh; Maximum Semester Hours: 3 sh]
A thematic or topical approach, with emphasis on historical/political/economic analysis. Treatment of historical, contemporary and/or comparative topics (for example, the historical roots and contemporary practice of terrorism and its political and economic impact; the impact of imperialism --political, economic, and historical-- in different global areas; the frontier experience of Russian Siberia and the American West) within a framework provided by the instructor.

Prerequisite: None

Corequisite: None

 
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